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Original research
Patient and nurse perceptions of an innovative TV wellness channel in an acute medical ward: a feasibility study
  1. Suzy Russell1,
  2. Vanya Ripley2,
  3. Rosalind Elliott3,4,
  4. Caryl Barnes1,5
  1. 1 Consultant Liaison Psychiatry, Royal North Shore Hospital, Northern Sydney Local Health District, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2 Department of General Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Northern Sydney Local Health District, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3 Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre, Directorate of Nursing and Midwifery, Northern Sydney Local Health District, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia
  4. 4 Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  5. 5 The University of Sydney Sydney Medical School, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Rosalind Elliott, Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre, Directorate of Nursing and Midwifery, Northern Sydney Local Health District, St Leonards NSW 2065, Australia; Rosalind.Elliott{at}health.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

Background The Consultation Liaison Psychiatry service attends to the mental health needs of patients treated in a general hospital setting after referral by the treating team. Interventions may include psychoeducation and psychological treatment.

A mindfulness focused ‘TV wellness’ channel was conceptualised as an innovative method of providing psychoeducation and mindfulness/relaxation. The objective was to explore the acceptability of a TV wellness channel to nurses and patients in an acute care inpatient setting and its effect on patient anxiety.

Methods This was a before and after prospective feasibility study. The intervention was a 30 min audio–visual television programme containing activities designed to reduce anxiety such as breathing and mindfulness exercises, nature film clips and short videos of clinical staff providing well-being tips during hospitalisation. Adult medical patients were requested to report their state anxiety using the Faces Anxiety Scale (1, low to 5 high anxiety) before and after viewing the channel. Patients and nurses reported on the acceptability of the content.

Results There was a trend to lower state anxiety after patients (n=61) watched the TV wellness channel but this was not clinically significant (mean difference (95 CI) 0.60 (0.36 to 0.87)). The patients and nurses’ evaluations were positive with few areas for improvement.

Conclusion Pilot evaluation of this innovative adjunct to Consultant Liaison Psychiatry provides evidence of its acceptability and potential to reduce anxiety for medical inpatients. This evaluation confirmed the feasibility of the TV wellness channel and has informed continued development and subsequent clinical research.

  • health care quality
  • access
  • and evaluation
  • hospital medicine
  • mental disorders
  • nursing
  • patient care

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @Rozmelliott

  • Contributors The study concept was conceived by SR. SR, VR and CB were responsible for the planning and conduct of the study. All authors were responsible for the study report. SR and CB are the study guarantors. RE was responsible for data analysis.

  • Funding Funding for the development of the TV wellness channel was provided by the Northern Sydney Local Health District Innovation Program (2019/20) and the study was funded by the NSW Ministry of Health (Nursing Innovation Scholarships 2019/2020).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement No data are available.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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