Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Original article
Development of an online smoking cessation program for use in hospital and following discharge: smoke-free recovery
  1. Sam McCrabb1,
  2. Zsolt Balogh1,2,
  3. Amanda L Baker1,
  4. Ian A Harris3,4,
  5. John Attia1,5,6,
  6. Natalie Lott2,
  7. Justine Naylor3,4,
  8. Christopher Doran7,
  9. Johnson George8,
  10. Luke Wolfenden1,9,
  11. Mark Wallis10,
  12. David Paul10,11,
  13. Frans Henskens10,
  14. Eliza Skelton1,
  15. Billie Bonevski1
  1. 1Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2Department of Traumatology, John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3Whitlam Orthopaedic Research Centre, Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
  4. 4Faculty of Medicine, South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
  5. 5Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, New Lambton, New South Wales, Australia
  6. 6Department of General Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton Heights, New South Wales, Australia
  7. 7School of Human, Health and Social Sciences, Central Queensland University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  8. 8Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  9. 9Hunter New England Local Health District Population Health, Wallsend, New South Wales, Australia
  10. 10Distributed Computing Research Group, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
  11. 11School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Sam McCrabb, School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, 1 University Drive, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia; Sam.McCrabb{at}newcastle.edu.au

Abstract

Background Tobacco smoking can have negative health outcomes on recovery from surgery. Although it is recommended best practice to provide patients with advice to quit and follow-up support, provision of post-discharge support is rare. Developing an online smoking cessation program may help address this gap.

Objectives This paper describes the development and pretesting of an online smoking cessation program (smoke-free recovery, SFR) tailored to the orthopaedic trauma population for use while in hospital and post-discharge.

Methods Drawing on the DoTTI framework for developing an online program, the following steps were followed for program development: (1) design and development; (2) testing early iteration; (3) testing for effectiveness and (4) integration and implementation. This article describes the first two stages of SFR program development.

Results SFR is a 10-module online smoking cessation program tailored for patients with orthopaedic trauma. Of the participants who completed testing early iterations, none reported any difficulties orientating themselves to the program or understanding program content. The main themes were that it was ‘helpful’, provision of ‘help to quit’ was low and SFR increased thoughts of ‘staying quit post-discharge’.

Conclusions This study found that a theory and evidence-based approach as the basis for an online smoking cessation program for patients with orthopaedic trauma was acceptable to users. A randomised controlled trial will be conducted to examine whether the online smoking cessation program is effective in increasing smoking cessation and how it can be integrated and implemented into hospital practice (stages three and four of the DoTTI framework).

  • Online
  • Smoking cessation
  • Orthopaedic trauma patients
  • eHealth
  • Hospital
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Contributors SMc assisted with the development of the intervention content, programed the intervention, assisted NL in conducting the surveys with the participants who trialled the programme and drafted the manuscript. BB, ZB, AB, IH, JA, NL, JN, CD, JG, LW, conceived the idea, assisted with the development of the intervention material and assisted with manuscript preparation. Further, NL conducted surveys of intervention users. ES assisted with the coding of the online program and assisted with manuscript preparation. MW, DP and FH developed the online platform as assisted with the coding of the intervention.

  • Funding BB is supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellowship (grant number 1063206) and a Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Gladys M Brawn Career Development Fellowship. SMc is supported by a 50/50 Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle PhD Scholarship and a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) research grant. ES is supported by a 50/50 Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle PhD Scholarship and a NHMRC research grant. This study was part of a project funded by a grant from the NHMRC (APP1071868).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval The study received ethics approval by Hunter New England Health Human Research Ethics committee (14/02/19/4.04).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.